February 22, 2024
Ford Laying Off Up To 3,000 Workers, Mostly In Michigan

Ford is the latest company to make drastic, sweeping job cuts - a trend that we have seen begin blanketing the U.S., despite "positive" jobs numbers. 

The Detroit based automaker is reportedly going to be laying off "up to 3,000" of its salaried workers, with the majority of them located in Michigan, according to the Detroit Free Press

On Monday, CEO Jim Farley wrote that the company needed to "tackle all aspects of costs — from materials to those related to quality." As a result, the company is cutting 2,000 from its salaried workforce and 1,000 employees from its agency employees in the U.S., Canada and India. 

"None of this changes the fact that this is a difficult and emotional time. The people leaving the company this week are friends and coworkers and we want to thank them for all they have contributed to Ford," the memo read. 

A spokesperson told the Detroit Free Press that a majority of the cuts would be in the U.S.: "The majority of our employee base is in Michigan so therefore a significant percentage of the job cuts are in Michigan.”

As automakers tend to do, Ford has been in the neverending process of restructuring its operations, not only to account for economic tradewinds, but also a forced shift to electric vehicles being mandated by the government. 

The jobs to be eliminated would be “based on a holistic look at the needs of the business," Ford said. 

However, the company quickly walked back the idea that the cuts were due to a recession. The company said that its forthcoming $2 billion investment in Michigan to create 3,200 union jobs to produce the electric F-150 was still on track.

The lay offs are "not a reaction to fears of a recession or concerns about the economy," a spokesperson said. "This is really just about positioning the company for success, to deliver on our plan and get our costs down." 

They continued: "So net-net we’re adding more jobs in Michigan. It’s a rebalancing because those jobs that we talked about adding were hourly employees. The jobs we’re talking about today are white-collar. On an absolute basis, we’re still adding employment in Michigan if you look at both commitments.”

Tyler Durden Tue, 08/23/2022 - 12:45

Ford is the latest company to make drastic, sweeping job cuts – a trend that we have seen begin blanketing the U.S., despite “positive” jobs numbers. 

The Detroit based automaker is reportedly going to be laying off “up to 3,000” of its salaried workers, with the majority of them located in Michigan, according to the Detroit Free Press

On Monday, CEO Jim Farley wrote that the company needed to “tackle all aspects of costs — from materials to those related to quality.” As a result, the company is cutting 2,000 from its salaried workforce and 1,000 employees from its agency employees in the U.S., Canada and India. 

“None of this changes the fact that this is a difficult and emotional time. The people leaving the company this week are friends and coworkers and we want to thank them for all they have contributed to Ford,” the memo read. 

A spokesperson told the Detroit Free Press that a majority of the cuts would be in the U.S.: “The majority of our employee base is in Michigan so therefore a significant percentage of the job cuts are in Michigan.”

As automakers tend to do, Ford has been in the neverending process of restructuring its operations, not only to account for economic tradewinds, but also a forced shift to electric vehicles being mandated by the government. 

The jobs to be eliminated would be “based on a holistic look at the needs of the business,” Ford said. 

However, the company quickly walked back the idea that the cuts were due to a recession. The company said that its forthcoming $2 billion investment in Michigan to create 3,200 union jobs to produce the electric F-150 was still on track.

The lay offs are “not a reaction to fears of a recession or concerns about the economy,” a spokesperson said. “This is really just about positioning the company for success, to deliver on our plan and get our costs down.” 

They continued: “So net-net we’re adding more jobs in Michigan. It’s a rebalancing because those jobs that we talked about adding were hourly employees. The jobs we’re talking about today are white-collar. On an absolute basis, we’re still adding employment in Michigan if you look at both commitments.”