April 15, 2024
Houthi Missile Hits Swiss-Owned Container Ship Near Aden

The Red Sea has transformed from one of the world's most important maritime trade routes into a warzone. Iran-backed Houthi rebels have withstood dozens of bombing raids by US and UK fighter jets. The Biden administration's Operation Prosperity Guardian continues to fail as yet another container ship was attacked on Tuesday. 

US Central Command posted on social media platform X that MSC Sky II, a container ship operated by MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co., was damaged in a missile attack about 90 miles southeast of the Yemeni city of Aden. 

On Mar. 4, at approximately 2:15 a.m. (Sanaa time), Iranian-backed Houthi terrorists fired an anti-ship ballistic missile from Yemen into the southern Red Sea. The missile impacted the water with no reported damage or injuries to commercial or US Navy ships.

Between the hours of 3:50 p.m. and 4:15 p.m. (Sanaa time), Iranian-backed Houthi terrorists fired two anti-ship ballistic missiles from Yemen into the Gulf of Aden at M/V MSC SKY II, a Liberian-flagged, Swiss-owned container vessel. One of the missiles impacted the vessel, causing damage. Initial reports indicate there were no injuries; the ship did not request assistance and continued on its way.

At 8 p.m. (Sanaa time), CENTCOM forces conducted self-defense strikes against two anti-ship cruise missiles that presented an imminent threat to merchant vessels and US Navy ships in the region. These actions are taken to protect freedom of navigation and make international waters safer and more secure for merchant and US Navy vessels.

MSC confirmed to Bloomberg that the vessel was attacked while transiting near the Bab el-Mandeb strait from Singapore toward Djibouti.

"The missile caused a small fire that has been extinguished while no crew were injured," the company said, adding, "She is currently continuing her journey to Djibouti and will arrive today for further assessment."

The Bab el-Mandeb Strait is one of three maritime chokepoints in the Middle East. This slide is from MUFG Bank. 

In a note over the weekend, we cited David Asher, a senior fellow at Hudson Institute's report titled "Navigating the New World Disorder: Economic Faultlines, Fissures, Fractures, and Failures," which pointed out - while the Red Sea crisis rages on - attention needs to turn to key oil facilities in Saudi Arabia of the next possible location Houthis will attack. 

Remember what happened in 2019? 

The world is one fire. 

Tyler Durden Tue, 03/05/2024 - 06:55

The Red Sea has transformed from one of the world’s most important maritime trade routes into a warzone. Iran-backed Houthi rebels have withstood dozens of bombing raids by US and UK fighter jets. The Biden administration’s Operation Prosperity Guardian continues to fail as yet another container ship was attacked on Tuesday. 

US Central Command posted on social media platform X that MSC Sky II, a container ship operated by MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co., was damaged in a missile attack about 90 miles southeast of the Yemeni city of Aden. 

On Mar. 4, at approximately 2:15 a.m. (Sanaa time), Iranian-backed Houthi terrorists fired an anti-ship ballistic missile from Yemen into the southern Red Sea. The missile impacted the water with no reported damage or injuries to commercial or US Navy ships.

Between the hours of 3:50 p.m. and 4:15 p.m. (Sanaa time), Iranian-backed Houthi terrorists fired two anti-ship ballistic missiles from Yemen into the Gulf of Aden at M/V MSC SKY II, a Liberian-flagged, Swiss-owned container vessel. One of the missiles impacted the vessel, causing damage. Initial reports indicate there were no injuries; the ship did not request assistance and continued on its way.

At 8 p.m. (Sanaa time), CENTCOM forces conducted self-defense strikes against two anti-ship cruise missiles that presented an imminent threat to merchant vessels and US Navy ships in the region. These actions are taken to protect freedom of navigation and make international waters safer and more secure for merchant and US Navy vessels.

MSC confirmed to Bloomberg that the vessel was attacked while transiting near the Bab el-Mandeb strait from Singapore toward Djibouti.

“The missile caused a small fire that has been extinguished while no crew were injured,” the company said, adding, “She is currently continuing her journey to Djibouti and will arrive today for further assessment.”

The Bab el-Mandeb Strait is one of three maritime chokepoints in the Middle East. This slide is from MUFG Bank. 

In a note over the weekend, we cited David Asher, a senior fellow at Hudson Institute‘s report titled “Navigating the New World Disorder: Economic Faultlines, Fissures, Fractures, and Failures,” which pointed out – while the Red Sea crisis rages on – attention needs to turn to key oil facilities in Saudi Arabia of the next possible location Houthis will attack. 

Remember what happened in 2019? 

The world is one fire. 

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