September 27, 2022
South Dakota primary voters rejected a ballot measure requiring any future ballot initiatives that increase taxes, or spend more than $10 million in five years, to pass with the support of at least 60% of voters. The measure was aimed at thwarting a proposal to expand Medicaid eligibility that voters will consider in November.

South Dakota primary voters rejected a ballot measure requiring any future ballot initiatives that increase taxes, or spend more than $10 million in five years, to pass with the support of at least 60% of voters. The measure was aimed at thwarting a proposal to expand Medicaid eligibility that voters will consider in November.

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Supporters of Constitutional Amendment C, dubbed the “Taxpayer Protection Amendment,” argued the higher threshold to pass such provisions would safeguard public funds more than the current 50%-plus-one majority required. Opponents said it would reduce the power of voters in the state to pass measures by ballot initiatives in the state.

A strong majority, more than two-thirds of voters, rejected the ballot measure requiring a two-thirds majority for some future efforts. The state’s legislature requires a two-thirds majority for any new taxes in order for them to be enacted.

The inclusion of Amendment C on the primary ballot was sparked by a drive to include an amendment on November’s ballot to expand federal Medicaid eligibility in the state. The state’s major healthcare groups opposed Amendment C in response. The Associated Press noted the state’s hospital systems are among its largest employers.

Fiscally conservative groups, including Americans for Prosperity, backed the effort.

​​CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Voters will consider the Medicaid expansion measure, Amendment D, in November.

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