December 5, 2022
Retired Sgt. Victor Butler, who was a mechanic for the Tuskegee Airmen, received thousands of birthday cards for his 100th birthday.

Retired Sgt. Victor Butler, who was a mechanic for the Tuskegee Airmen, received thousands of birthday cards for his 100th birthday.

The member of the group of legendary black military pilots who made history in World War II by breaking segregation barriers had asked for cards to mark the special birthday.

Butler received mail from 41 different states for the occasion on May 21, according to a report from WUSA9, which noted that his wife and daughter helped him go through the mail.

“They will explain that they realize what he went through and they apologize for their ancestors — that makes you feel good to know that Daddy actually made a change,” Butler’s daughter said.

Some of the cards asked if Butler is single.

WATCH: RETIRED TUSKEGEE AIRMAN WANTS BIRTHDAY CARDS TO CELEBRATE TURNING 100

“Whoever is interested in him, I’m sorry, he’s married and we’re happy,” his wife said with a chuckle.

Butler now lives in Rhode Island. He is believed to be one of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen, as fellow airman Charles McGee died in February at the age of 102.

Tuskegee Airmen 1942
African-American airplane mechanics of the 99th Pursuit Squadron inspect the engine of a BT-13 Valiant trainer aircraft at the new U.S. Army Flying School in Tuskegee, Ala., Sept. 5, 1942. In this first African-American aerial fighting unit, black pilots got a chance to fly with the U.S. Army Air Forces and receive Air Force commissions if they survived the hard grind prescribed for all cadets. To qualify, a man had to be between 18 and 27 and in top physical condition. He also had to pass an entrance exam of 150 questions.
(AP Photo)

While Butler has received several awards documenting his achievements, he asked for cards for his birthday and promised to read each one.

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“It’s just another day that’s all,” Butler said. “Oh, I’ll read every one of them.”

Birthday cards and wishes can still be mailed to Victor W. Butler, in the care of Gary Butler at P.O. box 3523, Cranston, Rhode Island, 02910.

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