November 26, 2022
The sun, Earth, and moon will align this weekend to create the first total lunar eclipse of 2022.

The sun, Earth, and moon will align this weekend to create the first total lunar eclipse of 2022.

A partial eclipse will begin Sunday night at 10:27 p.m. Eastern time, according to NASA. By 11:29 p.m., it will become a red “blood moon” as the total eclipse begins.

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“The entire Moon falls within the darkest part of Earth’s shadow, called the umbra,” NASA noted, explaining what an eclipse entails. “When the Moon is within the umbra, it will turn a reddish hue.”

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Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). The Moon moves right to left, passing through the penumbra and umbra, leaving in its wake an eclipse diagram with the times at various stages of the eclipse.
(Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Scientific Visualization Studio)

The total eclipse will end at 12:54 a.m. Monday when the Moon begins to leave the Earth’s shadow. The entire eclipse will conclude by 2:50 a.m.

A lunar eclipse is safe to view without protective equipment. Binoculars or a telescope can be helpful in getting a better view.

APTOPIX Japan Lunar Eclipse
The earth’s shadow covers the moon during a partial lunar eclipse Friday, Nov. 19, 2021, in Yokohama, near Tokyo. The first total lunar eclipse of 2022 will take place this Sunday, May 15.
(Eugene Hoshiko/AP)

The eastern half of the United States and all of South America will have the best view of each stage of the lunar eclipse.

It will also be visible in much of Africa, Western Europe, Central America, and most of North America.

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A map showing where the May 15-16, 2022 lunar eclipse is visible. Contours mark the edge of the visibility region at eclipse contact times. The map is centered on 63°52’W, the sublunar longitude at mid-eclipse.
(Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Scientific Visualization Studio)

The next total lunar eclipse will take place on Nov. 8, 2022.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Sunday’s eclipse is the second of the year. There was a partial solar eclipse on April 30, but it was not visible from the U.S.

A livestream of the lunar eclipse is available here.

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