May 20, 2024
Georgia Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Stacey Abrams said she would “welcome” support from President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris on the campaign trail as she fights to unseat Republican Gov. Brian Kemp.

Georgia Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Stacey Abrams said she would “welcome” support from President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris on the campaign trail as she fights to unseat Republican Gov. Brian Kemp.

Abrams’s willingness to appear alongside Biden and Harris, who both hold negative approval ratings, comes as her prospects in the race appear to dim.

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“There is no reticence on my part,” Abrams told the 19th News. “I know people will try to spin up stories where they don’t exist. I welcome President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to come to Georgia because that’s one of the ways we show Georgia what the Democrats have delivered for our state.”

The high-profile voting activist was a no-show when Biden and Harris visited Atlanta in January to campaign for voting rights.

Polls show Abrams trailing Kemp, despite blockbuster fundraising. The Democrat ran against the governor in 2018, a race she still contests.

But Abrams has lost ground with Democratic and centrist voters, according to recent surveys. She is also drawing less support than another prominent Democrat on the ballot, Sen. Raphael Warnock, who is seeking a full term after winning a special election in 2020.

A recent Fox News survey shows 8% of Kemp’s supporters backing Warnock.

In the article, Abrams defends her decision not to concede the gubernatorial race in 2018.

“My point was that the access to the election was flawed, and I refuse to concede a system that permits citizens to be denied access. That is very different than someone claiming fraudulent outcome,” Abrams said.

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A Sept. 5-16 poll by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution shows Kemp leading Abrams by 8 percentage points, 50% to 42%. A Marist poll conducted between Sept. 12 and 15 put Kemp ahead by 11 percentage points, 53% to 42%.

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