September 26, 2022
Washington Examiner Politics Editor James Antle said the characterization of the Jan. 6 committee's first prime-time hearing as a “production” is correct, noting that most people were likely not swayed in their opinion regarding the Capitol riot.

Washington Examiner Politics Editor James Antle said the characterization of the Jan. 6 committee’s first prime-time hearing as a “production” is correct, noting that most people were likely not swayed in their opinion regarding the Capitol riot.

“There was professional-level production value to this hearing,” Antle told C-SPAN’s Washington Journal. “They were making the most of their prime-time opportunity. I do think that just in terms of who was watching it, it is difficult to say that it changed any minds.”

“You know, there may be some number of people who watched in and had their minds changed,” Antle added. “But I doubt it was a very large number of people.”

WATCH: BILL MAHER BLASTS HOLLYWOOD FOR BEING ‘WOKEST’ ON EVERYTHING BUT GUNS

Antle noted that news cycles move very quickly, and many people are now concerned with gas prices and inflation.

Regardless of the issues of most concern to the public, Antle said that the hearing on Thursday may have set a precedent for future congressional hearings.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

“This is going to be a model that people are going to look at in the future,” Antle said. “Obviously, any time you are trying to put together a real story rather than simply give each member of the committee five to 15 minutes to ask whatever questions they want their constituents to see them asking, it is better to do it in a way that this committee did. I think this is going to be a precedent that is going to be followed in the future, but I don’t know that that’s going to be the standard way congressional committees do business going forward.”

Leave a Reply