December 5, 2022
Randy Weaver, the man infamous for his 11-day Ruby Ridge standoff with federal agents in Idaho in 1992, has died at the age of 74 on Wednesday, his daughter revealed.

Randy Weaver, the man infamous for his 11-day Ruby Ridge standoff with federal agents in Idaho in 1992, has died at the age of 74 on Wednesday, his daughter revealed.

No cause of death was revealed, but a post from April suggests he had been dealing with health problems.

“Love you always Dad,” Sara Weaver wrote in a Facebook post Thursday. “‘See ya next time I see ya.'”

GEORGIA MAN ARMED WITH BOW AND ARROW ALLEGEDLY CARJACKS WOMAN BEFORE BEING SHOT IN POLICE STANDOFF

Randy Weaver had been a survivalist who was investigated by the U.S. government after reports were made that he had ties to white supremacists and anti-government groups. The government went on to accuse Randy Weaver of having sold two illegal sawed-off shotguns to an undercover Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives informant, according to NPR.

Randy Weaver went to his cabin in Ruby Ridge with his family to avoid arrest. On Aug. 21, 1992, U.S. marshals descended on Randy Weaver’s property after he failed to appear in court.

A shootout took place in the woods that day when Randy Weaver, his friend Kevin Harris, and Randy Weaver’s 14-year-old son, Samuel, ran into the law enforcement officials conducting surveillance. Samuel Weaver and Deputy Marshal William Degan were killed in the exchange.

During the second day of the standoff, Randy Weaver’s wife, Vicki, was killed by a sniper while holding the couple’s infant baby.

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The Weavers and Harris surrendered to authorities Aug. 31.

Randy Weaver and Harris faced murder charges in the killing of Degan, but a jury acquitted the two men in 1993. Randy Weaver was convicted of two minor gun charges, according to the Spokesman-Review.

Randy Weaver was sentenced to 18 months in prison and released after 16 months for good behavior. The Justice Department disciplined 12 agents involved in the standoff, and the government gave Randy Weaver $100,000 and each of his three daughters $1 million as part of a settlement in 1995.

Randy Weaver is survived by wife Linda Gross, whom he married in 1999, and daughters Sara, Rachel, and Elisheba.

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